Search Tests

OFA Status


Type of Test


Breeds


Disease Type


Inheritance


Test Name

Name SKU Price Qty Action
S Locus (S-LOCUS) S-LOCUS $40.00

A mutation in the MITF gene is responsible for the disruption of pigment production which results in white or non-pigmented areas within a dog’s coat. The white coat coloration that results from this mutation can be observed in a number of different patterns that are often referred to as piebald, particolor, extreme white, landseer, flowered or Blenheim. Dogs that carry one copy of the mutation will typically show limited white spotting across their coat while dogs that carry two copies of the mutation will have nearly solid white coats with limited or no spots of additional coloring. It is important to note that the S Locus mutation will not identify a pattern of white spotting known as “Irish White Spotting” which is due to another unknown mutation.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and will have no white spotting, parti, piebald or flash coat color.

B (CARRIER/NOT AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with white coat color. They will have limited white spotting, flash, parti, or piebald coat color and, if bred, will pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation associated with white coat color which results in a nearly solid white, parti, or piebald coat color.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
FURNISHINGS- IMPROPER COAT LOCUS (FURN-IC-LOCUS) FURN-IC-LOCUS $40.00

A mutation in the RSPO2 gene leads to a change in a dog’s coat hair length known as “Furnishings” which describes a wiry hair texture with increased hair growth on the face and legs. This mutation is associated with the presence of a canine moustache and long eyebrows as listed for the breed standard of certain breeds such as Lagotto Romagnolo, Portuguese Water Dog and Poodle crosses. Members of these breeds that are born without furnishings are classified as having an “improper coat” as defined by a failure to meet the breed standard. This mutation is inherited in a dominant fashion which means a dog only needs to inherit one copy of the mutation to develop longer facial hair. This test can be used to detect dogs that are carriers of a gene that lacks the furnishings mutation and can lead to puppies with improper coats. It is important to note that improper coat is not a disease and simply means the dog will have shorter facial hair which in some breeds is not a desirable trait as established by the breed standard.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and will neither develop furnishings nor pass this mutation to their offspring. This result can also be referred to as improper coat in certain breeds that require furnishings as part of the breed standard.

B (CARRIER/AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with furnishings. They will develop longer facial hair and will, if bred, pass the mutation associated with furnishings to 50% of its offspring, on average. These dogs also carry a copy of the normal gene that can be passed to 50% of its offspring, on average that could produce a puppy with an improper coat as defined by the breed standard for certain breeds.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation associated with furnishings and will typically display longer facial hair and will pass this mutation to 100% of their offspring. These dogs do not carry a copy of the normal gene which can be passed to offspring and lead to an improper coat.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
A-At Locus (A-At-Locus) A-At Locus $40.00

The A Locus (agouti series) interacts closely with the E, K, and B Loci that can lead to a dog’s overall coat color and pattern. A Locus mutations are only expressed if the dog is “Clear” or “Carrier” at the E locus and “Clear” at the K-KB locus. There are three potential mutations at the A Locus that can each have a different effect on coat color. The mutations are known as A-ay, A-at and A-a and can determine whether a dog is a Carrier of sable/fawn, black and tan/tricolor/tan points coloration or a recessive form of a solid black or bicolor coat color.

The A-at gene mutation produces a coat pattern typically referred to as “tricolor” or “black-and-tan”. For dogs that are “Clear” at the K-KB Locus and have two copies of the A-at mutation or one copy of the A-at mutation and one copy of the A-a mutation will express this coat pattern. This also means a dog that appears tricolor or black-and-tan can carry the A-a allele and would not express recessive black. This is due to the fact that the A-Locus alleles are expressed in a hierarchical manner with A-ay being dominant to and expressed over A-at and A-a. It is important to note that the dog’s coat color is also dependent on the dog’s genotypes at E, K, and B Locus among others.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and the effect of A Locus on their coat color can be determined by testing at the A-a locus. They will also not pass this mutation to any of their offspring.

B (CARRIER/AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with tricolor or black-and-tan. They will exhibit a tricolor or black-and-tan coat pattern in the absence of the A-ay mutation. However, this dog’s coat color is also dependent on the E, K, and B Locus genes. They will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of their offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation and will develop a tricolor or black-and-tan coat pattern due to the A-at locus mutation and will pass this mutation to 100% of their offspring. However, this dog’s coat color is also dependent on the E, K, and B Locus genes.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
A-Ay Locus (A-AY-LOCUS) A-AY-LOCUS $40.00

The A Locus (agouti series) interacts closely with the E, K, and B Loci that can lead to a dog’s overall coat color and pattern. A Locus mutations are only expressed if the dog is “Clear” or “Carrier” at the E locus and “Clear” at the K-KB locus. There are three potential mutations at the A Locus that can each have a different effect on coat color. The mutations are known as A-ay, A-at and A-a and can determine whether a dog is a Carrier of sable/fawn, black and tan/tricolor/tan points coloration or a recessive form of a solid black or bicolor coat color.

The A-ay gene mutation produces a coat color that can range from a light fawn to darker red to a sable based on variation in gene expression. For dogs that are “Clear” at the K-KB Locus and have one or two copies of the A-ay mutation will always express a sable/fawn coat color. This means a dog that appears fawn or sable can carry any of the other A-locus alleles (A-at, A-a or A-aw) and would not express them. The A-Locus alleles are expressed in a hierarchical manner with A-ay being dominant to and expressed over A-aw, A-at and A-a. A-aw is the next most dominant mutation followed by A-at and the least dominant mutation, A-a. It is important to note that the dog’s coat color is also dependent on the dog’s genotypes at E, K, and B Locus among others.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and the effect of A Locus on their coat color can be determined by testing at the A-at and A-a loci. They will also not pass this mutation to any of their offspring.

B (CARRIER/AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with sable/fawn coat color. They will exhibit a sable/fawn coat color. The effects of A Locus on offspring coat color can be determined by testing at the A-at and A-a loci. They will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of their offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation and will develop a sable/fawn coat color due to the A-ay locus mutation and will pass this mutation to 100% of their offspring. However, this dog’s coat color is also dependent on the E, K, and B Locus genes.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
A-a Locus (A-A-LOCUS) A-A-LOCUS $40.00

The A Locus (agouti series) interacts closely with the E, K, and B Loci that can lead to a dog’s overall coat color and pattern. A Locus mutations are only expressed if the dog is “Clear” or “Carrier” at the E locus and “Clear” at the K-KB locus. There are three potential mutations at the A Locus that can each have a different effect on coat color. The mutations are known as A-ay, A-at and A-a and can determine whether a dog is a Carrier of sable/fawn, black and tan/tricolor/tan points coloration or a recessive form of a solid black or bicolor coat color.

The A-a Locus mutation results in a dog that is solid black. To confirm the source of the black coat, this also requires testing for the K-KB Locus to determine if the black color is derived from the dominant K-KB mutation or the recessive A-a mutation. A common example of the effect of this mutation is typically seen in solid black German Shepherds.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and the effect of A Locus on their coat color can be determined by testing at the A-ay and A-at loci. They will also not pass this mutation to any of their offspring.

B (CARRIER/NOT AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with this disease. They will not develop a solid black or bicolor coat due to this mutation and the effect of A Locus on their coat color can be determined by testing at the A-ay and A-at loci. They will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of their offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation and will typically develop a solid black or bicolor coat due to the A-a locus mutation and will pass this mutation to 100% of their offspring. However, this dog’s coat color is also dependent on the E, K, and B Locus genes.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
K-KB Locus (K-KB-Locus) K-KB-Locus $40.00

A mutation in K Locus (CBD103 gene) known as the K-KB allele allows production of black pigment (eumelanin) by preventing A Locus expression which would normally block production of black pigment. The naturally occurring version of the K Locus gene lacking a mutation normally functions to allow for A Locus gene expression which inhibits black pigment synthesis. The K-KB mutation is referred to as dominant which means only one copy of KB is required to inhibit A Locus gene expression and result in a black coat coloring commonly referred to as “Dominant Black”. Dogs with one or two copies of K-KB will not express A Locus coat colors (sable/fawn, tricolor, black and tan, or tan points) and their coat color will be solid in pigmented areas with the final coat color determined by the E and B Loci. Dogs that test “Clear” for the K-KB mutation allows A Locus gene expression and can produce puppies with sable/fawn, tricolor, or tan points depending on the mutations present at the A locus.

All Breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal K Locus gene, which allows for A Locus expression and can result in a variety of coat colors including sable/fawn, tricolor, tan points, black or brown. The coat color for dogs with a normal K Locus gene is dependent on its genotype at the E, A and B Loci and they will not pass the K-KB mutation to their offspring.

B (CARRIER/AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the K-KB mutation that leads to black coloring in pigmented areas of the dog. They can have a black-based coat and will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average. This dog’s coat color is also dependent on its genotypes at the E and B Loci.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation that allows black coloring in pigmented areas of the dog and will pass the mutation to 100% of its offspring. This dog’s coat color is also dependent on its genotypes at the E and B Locus genes.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
Coat Length/Fluffy Locus (LENGTH) LENGTH $40.00

The length of a dog’s coat can vary between breeds with some breeds typically showing short haired coats and other breeds showing long haired coats. It has been determined that hair length variation is due to a mutation in the FGF5 gene that changes the hair follicle growth termination signal which impacts canine hair length. The mutation is recessive which means a dog must have two copies of the mutation that will typically result in a long or fluffy coat.

All breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and will neither develop long hair nor pass this mutation to their offspring.

B (CARRIER/NOT AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with this trait. They will not develop long hair and will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation associated with long hair which results in a long-haired coat.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
Curly Coat Locus (CURL) CURL $40.00

Hair curl is an incomplete dominant characteristic caused by a mutation in the KRT71 gene. Incomplete dominance refers to the fact that a dog can carry one copy of the gene which will result in a moderately curly (known as “wavy”) coat or two copies of the mutation which will result in a tightly curled coat. Dogs lacking the mutation will typically have straight hair. This particular mutation can be found prevalently in some breeds that typically display a curly coat. The hair curl mutation can also be accompanied by the other mutations such as coat length and furnishings that can also contribute to the overall look of a dog’s coat.

Airedale Terrier
American Water Spaniel
Bichon Frise
Border Collie
Boykin Spaniel
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Chihuahua
Dachshund
Havana Silk Dog
Havanese
Kerry Blue Terrier
Kuvasz
Leonberger
Maltese
Pharaoh Hound
Portuguese Water Dog
Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Welsh Terrier
Wire Fox Terrier

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene and will have straight hair.

B (CARRIER/AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with a curly coat type. Due to incomplete dominant expression, these dogs can have a “wavy” or moderately curly coat that is in the spectrum somewhere between a curly and a straight coat. They will also if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the mutation which typically results in a tight curly coat.

 

Name SKU Price Qty Action
D Locus (D-LOCUS) D-LOCUS $40.00

The MLPH gene codes for a protein called melanophilin, which is responsible for transporting and fixing melanin-containing cells. A mutation in this gene leads to improper distribution of these cells, causing a dilute coat color. This mutation is recessive so two copies of the mutated gene (or “d” allele) are needed to produce the dilute coat color. This mutation affects both Eumelanin and Pheomelanin pigments, so black, brown and yellow dogs are all affected by the dilution with the effect being more pronounced in black dogs. The mutation responsible for the dilution phenotype is recessive so a dog can be a carrier of the dilution gene and still appear to have a normal coat color. A diluted yellow dog is often referred to as a champagne.

It is important to note that certain breeds have exhibited an association between carrying two copies of the D Locus mutation and a dermatological condition called color dilution alopecia (CDA) or black hair follicular dysplasia (BHFD). These conditions are characterized by hair loss and potential recurring skin infections. The effect is variable within and between breeds so not all dogs that carry two copies of the D Locus mutation will exhibit symptoms. It is likely that additional mutations or environmental factors are involved so the D Locus status of a particular dog can be used as a guide in determining potential disease susceptibility.

It is also important to note that a newly discovered second mutation in the MLPH gene (MLPH:c.705G>C) has recently been described for Chow Chows, Sloughis and Thai Ridgeback breeds. Although rare, this mutation can also lead to dilute coat color in these breeds. This newly discovered mutation will not be detected by the current D Locus test.

All breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene, will have an undiluted coat and will not pass the mutation to their offspring.

B (CARRIER/NOT AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with dilute coat coloring. They will have an undiluted coat but will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the MLPH mutation associated with a diluted coat color which results in blue, charcoal, grey, lilac or champagne coat dependent on other coat color loci.

Name SKU Price Qty Action
E Locus (E-LOCUS) E-LOCUS $40.00

A mutation in the MC1R gene (E locus) is responsible for the presence of yellow to red coats in many different domestic dog breeds. The dominant non-mutated form of the gene (“E” allele) allows the dog to produce a black pigment called Eumelanin. A mutation in the MC1R gene causes the pigment-producing cells to generate a yellow pigment called Pheomelanin. A dog must have two copies of the MC1R recessive mutation (represented as the “e” allele) to express the solid yellow coat color. This “ee” genotype can vary in expression ranging from yellow or red coloring to more subtle differences (apricot, cream or white) depending on the breed. It is important to note that the genetic cause of what is termed “Red” in some breeds (Dobermans, Australian Shepherds, etc.) is due to a mutation in B Locus and not E Locus.

All breeds

A (CLEAR/NORMAL): These dogs have two copies of the normal gene, will have a black-based coat and will not pass the mutation to their offspring.

B (CARRIER/NOT AFFECTED): These dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation associated with yellow to red coloring. They will have a black-based coat but will, if bred, pass the mutation to 50% of its offspring, on average.

C (AT RISK/AFFECTED): These dogs have two copies of the MC1R mutation associated with a yellow coat which results in a yellow to red coat coloring that varies by breed.

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